Supreme Court upholds ERISA plan document statute of limitations

By Andrea Davis In what can be viewed as a victory for plan sponsors, the Supreme Court ruled on Monday that statute of limitation periods written into plan documents are valid, as long as those periods are “reasonable.” The court, however, declined to define “reasonable.” Read more&#
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High Court Agrees to Examine Contractual Limitations Periods Under ERISA

The U.S. Supreme Court announced April 15 that it will address the question of when the statute of limitations for judicial review of an adverse disability benefit determination begins to accrue under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (Heimeshoff v. Hartford Life & Accid
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The exhaustion of administrative remedies is not required in an ERISA benefits case when a participant can “reasonably interpret” the plan to not require exhaustion

This case concerns the calculation of a participant’s benefit, and whether that benefit should include (among other things) an early retirement credit. The plan’s administrative procedures apply when a participant wants to “file a benefit claim,” but this parti
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Second Circuit: Deferential Standard Applies Without Notice To Participants & Reimbursement Claims Are Equitable Relief

Yesterday, the Second Circuit ruled on two important issues of note for ERISA plan sponsors and plan fiduciaries. In Thurber v. Aetna Life Insurance Co., 2013 WL 950704 (2d Cir. Mar. 13, 2013), the Court ruled that participants and beneficiaries are not required to be put on notice th
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