My Trip to the Emergency Room

By: Jen McCormick, Esq.

Since becoming a mom, I’ve experienced two pretty scary parenting adventures – taking a toddler to Disney World solo and taking a toddler to the emergency room. While I faced long lines, costly food, and anxiety during both events, it was the emergency department visit that by far was the scariest.

After a same-day sick visit at the pediatrician’s office, we were sent to the emergency room. Our pediatrician administered a treatment onsite, but after not quickly seeing results or improvement in my toddler’s condition, we were sent to the emergency department. This was terrifying to hear, but also a bit surprising to me. My toddler seemed in good spirits and seemed happy.

Of course I didn’t want to second guess the doctor, especially when my child’s health may be on the line, but I had to ask why they needed us to rush to the emergency department – was something happening and I just didn’t realize it? Not exactly. The pediatrician said that our toddler’s oxygen level was too low and his respiratory rate was too fast – and he needed to be monitored and that was not something the pediatrician’s office could do or had time to do.

I couldn’t help but question whether this was the most effective (cost or otherwise) way to manage care. Then again, it was my toddler and being a mom superseded my desire to argue. We went, and were monitored, and I continually questioned what was happening (and why) during each treatment step.

We try to encourage patients to take control of their health care – make informed decisions and properly utilize the emergency room (for emergency situations). I am not suggesting that our situation was not urgent or an emergency, but it was unexpected that the next step for us was the emergency department.  Maybe this is a trend (sending patients to emergency departments after a primary care visit) or due to time or resources. Either way, question what is happening so you better understand, and more importantly, ensure you receive the most appropriate care (particularly for our patients too young to speak for themselves).