“Stay away from Back Surgery”: A Warning from NBA Coach Steve Kerr

By: Jason Davis

Steve Kerr’s comments can be viewed as a warning for self-funded payers and their administrators to educate their members on the shortcomings of some surgeries which are extremely expensive and often unnecessary.

According to the American Journal of Orthopedics, over a third of Americans reported some musculoskeletal conditions that significantly impaired their normal routines. For many, these issues develop into the perceived need for serious orthopedic procedures and joint replacements, which are among the most profitable surgeries in all of medicine based on the time the surgeries actually take.

It therefore comes as no surprise to discover that, in the last 10 years, the occurrence and associated costs of serious orthopedic procedures have both jumped by 300%. Current projections are that this trend will continue, and (as an example) we may see an additional 400% increase in joint replacements by 2030.

What is the reason for this steady and significant increase in serious orthopedic surgeries and joint replacement procedures?  Regardless of whose opinion you read, you will be told that the reason for more orthopedic procedures is because we are getting older, and we are getting heavier.  This, however, does not fully capture the often-overlooked third factor: consumers are simply being offered greater access to more surgical options.  As an example, adjusted data from the Orthopedic and Arthritis Center for Outcomes Research demonstrates that obesity and the aging population fails to account for the 134% increase in total knee replacements between 1998 and 2007 (overall, a 300% increase).  So how do we account for it?  It is not a stretch to suggest that at least part of the increase in serious orthopedic procedures and joint replacements is attributable to the provider community pushing for these surgical options more often than ever before (as mentioned, these surgeries are huge revenue drivers).

Steve Kerr is a powerful voice that is highlighting the importance of understanding pros/cons of surgery, exploring alternatives, and getting a second medical opinion – preferably from someone without a financial incentive to supporting the surgery in the first place.